The same technology used to track and find Osama bin Laden is now being studied to lengthen the shelf life of bakery cakes.

The same technology used to track and find Osama bin Laden is now being studied to lengthen the shelf life of bakery cakes.

Researchers from Strathclyde University are working with a Finsbury Food Group cake company in the United Kingdom called Lightbody to analyze how the cakes deteriorate and create an optimum recipe to extend their shelf life.

Hyperspectral imaging was used by the U.S. military in the hunt for Bin Laden, and by photographing the electromagnetic spectrum it allows the chemical and material make-up of any object to be easily indentified.

Stephen Marshall, professor of image processing from Strathclyde University said: “With hyperspectral imaging, you can tell the chemical content of a cake just by taking a photo of it. It tells you what’s going on, how the sugars are breaking down, how the fats are breaking down. If bakers can get the formula right, they can extend the shelf life.”

Another invention that was created by the military, but then found its way into kitchens around the world is the microwave.

British military forces created a magnetron during the second World War, and then several years later it was discovered by accident that the microwaves emitted from the magnetron could be used to cook food.

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